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Multipitch climbing

Crag Info: Schreyfels in the Danube Valley (Donautal)

Crag Info: Schreyfels in the Danube Valley (Donautal)

Schreyfels is another popular crag in the Danube Valley. As soon as I saw a picture of Opakante in my guidebook, it went straight to the top of my list and I’m hoping to go back as soon as weather (and free time) permits.

I visited Schreyfels last summer with an Australian friend for one last climb before he flew home. We arrived at sunrise and were first on the rock. Being another crag cut by the Danube, its views are fantastic. Climbers can look over small villages stretching out the length of the valley dotted with crags in every direction. This is one of the most popular regions to climb in Baden-Württemberg and offers about 30 different crags in a small area along the river. It’s the kind of rural German landscape scenes that foreigners like to imagine full of Fachwerkhäuser .

Quick Facts:

  • Height:  70m
  • Routes: 27
  • Grades: 4 routes < 5.6 | 15 routes between 5.9-5.10c/d
  • Rock: Limestone
  • Distance from Stuttgart: 1:20 by car
  • Approach: 10-15 minutes uphill
  • Protection: Mix of new and old bolts.
  • Walk off: No. rappel only
  • Guidebook: Kletterführer Donautal
  • Family friendly: No

Schreyfels Overview:

Schreyfels is located not far from Hausen im Tal and Stuhlfels. The “village” or rather collection of a few houses where it’s located is called Langenbrunn, but that  may not be easy to find on a map or GPS. Luckily, it’s just a few kilometers drive from Hausen i.T. In contrast to Stuhlfels, it only has a handful of easy climbs and offers mostly moderate to hard multipitch routes.

For Opakante specifically, you don’t need to bring any trad gear. There are a handful of places you could place it if you want, but it’s never absolutely necessary. Do make sure to bring alpine draws that you can extend out to 60cm.

Popular climbs at Stuhlfels:

Being especially well known for Opakante and multipitch routes, the most popular climbs reflect that.  Here are the four probably most popular routes at Schreyfels (in UIAA):

  • Opakante: 3+, 3+, 3+
  • Weg der Jugend: 5+, 6-, 5
  • Brot und Speck: 5-, 6-, 5+
  • Dülferverschneidung: 6-, 6

Getting There:

Similar to Stuhlfels, the best bet is to head for Hausen im Tal (Hausen i.T. on road signs).  As always, be very careful of speeding as soon as you’re off the highway or B27. Small towns will nail you with speed cameras. From Hausen, it’s just a few minutes west along the river to a tiny village called Langenbrunn.

Once you see the Langenbrunn sign, drive 800 meters and stop at the very first parking lot on the right (it’s the only one). I missed it the first time because it’s so small and easy to overlook/ignore. Park and you’ll immediately see the crag sign at the trailhead. Once on the trail, there are several further signs directing climbers to the crag (see pictures below).

Where to stay:

You can either stay at the DAV Ebinger Haus directly in Hausen im Tal or camp directly on the Danube at Camping Wagenburg. That is where most climbers base themselves. But this is of course also an easy day trip from Stuttgart and takes about 1:20 one-way.

Schreyfels Gallery from my visit:

 

Crag Info: Stuhlfels in Hausen im Tal in the Donautal region

Crag Info: Stuhlfels in Hausen im Tal in the Donautal region

Stuhlfels is a well known and much loved crag in Baden-Würtemberg. It is centrally located in the state, has a short approach, boasts beautiful views of the Danube Valley and has a multitude of easy multipitch routes for beginners.

Quick Facts:

  • Height: up to 100m
  • Routes: 62 (1/3 are 5.8 and below)
  • Rock: Limestone
  • Distance from Stuttgart: 1:20 by car
  • Approach: 10 minutes, all uphill
  • Protection: A mix of new and old bolts, walk off possible
  • Family friendly: Meh. Not friendly, but not bad either.
  • Guidebook: Kletterführer Donautal
  • Bonus: the views!

Stuhlfels Overview:

Stuhlfels towers above the little village of Hausen im Tal on the Danube. It’s a short walk to the town and has gorgeous views of the valley. Moreover, it has many easy routes and is mostly more than 90 degrees making it a perfect destination for new climbers and especially those doing their first multipitch.

I’ll always have fond memories of Stuhlfels. Coming from a rather flat area of the US, it was my first opportunity to climb a multipitch route. After months of reading and practicing (yes, my gym has 2 pitch routes setup so you can practice!), I then showed my fellow first-timer Aussie friend the belay techniques and we sailed up Irisweg. Afterwards, we of course made sure to exchange innuendo filled comments like “I’m happy my first time was with you” and that we’d finally popped our multipitch cherry together, etc.

But Stuhlfels isn’t just for beginners. If you’re willing to stick with the 5.10 routes and up, you’ll have them mostly to yourself! But no matter what you climb, get there early or go on weekdays. Otherwise it can get crowded. The best times on the weekend are to be there around sunrise (which probably comes from the hunter in me) or late afternoon. During the week it won’t mater. Also watch for the “Schulferien” or school vacation times when roads (and generally everything) get crowded.

Popular climbs at Stuhlfels:

Being well known for easy multipitch routes, the most popular climbs reflect that. Given in UIAA grades, they are:

Getting There:

Where to stay:

You can either stay at the DAV Ebinger Haus or if you want to camp directly on the Danube, try Camping Wagenburg. That is where most climbers base themselves for reaching the areas dozens of crags

Stuhlfels Gallery from my two visits